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Birds in the park.

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Birds in the park.

Postby Pesadilla » Sun Dec 09, 2018 10:19 pm

I dreamed I was in the park in my hometown where I often played as a child. Many peafowl were in the park. They were screeching and trying to fan their tails but as they were in molt they were lacking. One flew but fell on his side. I was afraid he was dead but he eventually got up. Most birds were male but a few hens were present and even fewer chicks. There were also some pigeons of the common city variety. This was in summer. Then miraculously it was winter. The peafowl and pigeons were gone and instead there were numerous white doves, mallards, and wood ducks (of both sexes) contentedly resting in the snow. There was a hen and drake wood duck that were albinos in the flock. They nearly let me touch them and I was drawn to their beauty.
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Re: Birds in the park.

Postby Pesadilla » Wed Dec 12, 2018 4:54 am

Anyone? Or are the spammers clogging up the site again?
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Re: Birds in the park.

Postby Ghuntington » Wed Dec 12, 2018 7:01 pm

Hi,
When creatures show up in my dreams they're usually totems, i.e. guides. I will babble on a bit here about this to give you some perspective and then interpret the dream as if its my own.

My view on reality is different than many others. I believe we live in a virtual reality (VR) where every choice is tested out to see what the VR learns about compassion. Often, not being compassionate is one of the many ways to learn about compassion.

Further, I also believe that before we incarnate into the VR, we very carefully choose our family, life circumstances, etc. We also then carefully select our personality. I've been learning that these are belief filters that, in effect, restrict our knowledge of our greater self.

Finally, I also believe that each of us has one or more guides through our lifetime. These are some of our other lives, who are spiritually beside us, the entire VR lifetime. In my case, I have three but the number doesn't matter.

Then, we also have many, many different guides/teachers around us. They are there to coach us, if we are listening. Often, they will take the form of creatures, using them to convey certain traits, etc. to us. In my case, I have many, many of them. Well I should reword that differently. I am now aware I have many, many of them.

Sadly, most people aren't listening to themselves and thus the "coaches" are somewhat sidelined at the conscious level. They are therefore left to work with us when we are out of our bodies in the dream state.

I also want to note that I believe that our guides, totems et al can't tell us what to do. Why? It's because we have free choice within the VR. It's up to each of us to make choices each and every moment.

Before getting to your wonderful dream, I feel the need to insert here a saying by an old entity called Silver Birch. He was brought through in the 1900's by a man named Maurice Barbanelle. He wrote many books through him. Like many entites (Seth, etc.) they are full of wisdom of one is listening for it. Here's the quote that came to my mind as I am writing this to you:
"Of course there will be problems in Life. Earth is a place where you are presented with difficulties, frustrations, obstacles and handicaps. The whole purpose of earthly existence is to meet conditions that are a challenge to the evolving spirit so that it can have the chance to epxress some of its latent qualities that can be called on in times of crisis.
You cannot achieve spiritual mastery without conquering the problems that you encounter; but none is so insuperable that you cannot overcome it. You will have to be patient and pray for guidance that at the right time the door will open and the way will be shown. I always tell my friends in very simple language never to bang against a closed door."

And this one...
"If you prefer blindness, keep your eyes closed. If you prefer deafness keep your ears closed. But if you are wise, you will open the windows of your soul so that you can become aware of that mighty, vast power of the spirit which will strengthen and encourage you and make you know how life can be lived and enjoyed to the full."

Okay, one last point before I begin interpreting your dream as if it was my own. One of the first resources I turn to when creatures come into my dream/life is "Animal Speak" by Ted Andrews. Then, I usually google the creature with the word "totem" after it and read through. I am looking for messages that resonate within me. If you are a natural nature lover, then use your own wonderful skills to observe the creature and learn from it. On with the dream...

If this was my dream, here's my interpretation of it...

The first thing I consider is were I am locating my dream. I could have selected any place in any reality in any time and yet, here I am in the park I used to go to as a child. I am sending myself a message to go back to this time to reflect on events that happened then. They pertain to this dream scene.

Next, I note that I am outside. in my dreams, outside is usually a symbol of my feminine. So there I am, standing in my feminine observing. What do I see? Many peafowl.

Ted Andrews has a section on pheasants, which is the same family. Here's what he says:
PHEASANT
KEYNOTE: Family Fertility and Sexuality
CYCLE OF POWER: Year-round

Anyone with a pheasant as a totem would do well to also study the grouse and the chicken. Though of the same family, there are differences. The pheasant needs grasslands and grain fields, hedges and brush to survive in the wild. These environments should be studied by those with this totem.

Originally pheasants came from Greece, near the area of the Phasis River, from which we get the name pheasant. There they ran wild in the kingdom of Colchis. Today, some pheasants are wild as in the grouse or the quail which are distantly related. Others-most to be exact-are domesticated. Because of this, the pheasant is most often linked to the energies of family fertility and sexuality.

Most pheasants have splendid tail plumes. Tail plumes have long been associated with sexuality and the greater expression of it. The colors and kinds of feathers can provide even greater insight, as the feathering and types of pheasants varies greatly. A ringnecked pheasant, for example, multiplies in domestication successfully. The ringed markings on its neck reflect that fertility and growth within its family- a spiraling outward. Another example could be the badger feathers found on pheasants. These feathers have the appearance of striped, tapered markings similar to the badger. Anyone with a pheasant totem that has badger feathers would do well to study the characteristics of the badger itself.

The colors reflect much, and most pheasants have a variety of colors and feathers which should be examined. They all can reflect different aspects of the energies the pheasant symbolize for you. Pheasants are good teachers in how to set romantic moods through the warmth of colours.

I also like referring to the work of Avia on what's my sign. Here's what she says about peacocks:
Meaningful Peacock Symbolism in Culture and History

The peacock is a possessor of some of the most admired human characteristics, and is a symbol of integrity and the beauty we can achieve when we endeavor to show our true colors.

In history, myth, legend and lore, the peacock symbolism carries portents of: Nobility, Holiness, Guidance, Protection and Watchfulness.

Contemplate the powers of the peacock when you need more vibrancy and vitality in your experience. The peacock can also help you on your spiritual Path, and breath new life into your walk of faith.

The peacock can rejuvenate self-esteem levels too. If you’re feeling “blah” and blue, imagine the glorious, techno-color display the peacock provides. This puts us in a proper mood to embrace your own nobility. In no time, you’ll be walking tall and proud as a peacock too!

Here is a keyword quick-list of peacock symbolism…
Symbolic Peacock Meanings
Glory
Regal
Vision
Royalty
Freedom
Attraction
Expression
Spirituality
Awakening
Immortality
Refinement
Incorruptibility

In Greco-Roman mythology the peacock is identified with Hera (Juno) who created the peacock from Argus whose hundred eyes (seen on the tail feathers of the peacock) symbolize the vault of heaven and the eyes of the stars.

In Hinduism the peacock is associated with Lakshmi who is a deity representing benevolence, patience, kindness, compassion and good luck.

Similar to Lakshmi, the peacock is associated with Kwan-yin in Asian spirituality. Kwan-yin (or Quan Yin) is also an emblem of love, compassionate watchfulness, good-will, nurturing, and kind-heartedness. Legend tells us she chose to remain a mortal even though she could be immortal because she wished to stay behind and aid humanity in their spiritual evolution.

In Babylonia and Persia the peacock is seen as a guardian to royalty, and is often seen in engravings upon the thrones of royalty.

In Christianity the peacock symbolism represents the “all-seeing” church, along with the holiness and sanctity associated with it. Additionally, the peacock represents resurrection, renewal and immortality within the spiritual teachings of Christianity.

Peacock Symbolism


peacock symbolism and peacock meaning
Peacock Symbolism and Peacock Meaning


Meaningful Peacock Symbolism in Culture and History

The peacock is a possessor of some of the most admired human characteristics, and is a symbol of integrity and the beauty we can achieve when we endeavor to show our true colors.

In history, myth, legend and lore, the peacock symbolism carries portents of: Nobility, Holiness, Guidance, Protection and Watchfulness.

Contemplate the powers of the peacock when you need more vibrancy and vitality in your experience. The peacock can also help you on your spiritual Path, and breath new life into your walk of faith.

The peacock can rejuvenate self-esteem levels too. If you’re feeling “blah” and blue, imagine the glorious, techno-color display the peacock provides. This puts us in a proper mood to embrace your own nobility. In no time, you’ll be walking tall and proud as a peacock too!

Here is a keyword quick-list of peacock symbolism…

Symbolic Peacock Meanings
Glory
Regal
Vision
Royalty
Freedom
Attraction
Expression
Spirituality
Awakening
Immortality
Refinement
Incorruptibility

“The purest and most thoughtful minds
are those which love color the most.”
~John Ruskin

In Greco-Roman mythology the peacock is identified with Hera (Juno) who created the peacock from Argus whose hundred eyes (seen on the tail feathers of the peacock) symbolize the vault of heaven and the eyes of the stars.

In Hinduism the peacock is associated with Lakshmi who is a deity representing benevolence, patience, kindness, compassion and good luck.

Similar to Lakshmi, the peacock is associated with Kwan-yin in Asian spirituality. Kwan-yin (or Quan Yin) is also an emblem of love, compassionate watchfulness, good-will, nurturing, and kind-heartedness. Legend tells us she chose to remain a mortal even though she could be immortal because she wished to stay behind and aid humanity in their spiritual evolution.

In Babylonia and Persia the peacock is seen as a guardian to royalty, and is often seen in engravings upon the thrones of royalty.

In Christianity the peacock symbolism represents the “all-seeing” church, along with the holiness and sanctity associated with it. Additionally, the peacock represents resurrection, renewal and immortality within the spiritual teachings of Christianity.


Themes of renewal are also linked to alchemical traditions to, as many schools of thought compare the resurrecting phoenix to the modern-day peacock. Along these lines, the peacock is a colorful symbol of transformation. Like the phoenix, the alchemy peacock can remind us that we can rise out of our darkest moments. It’s a metaphor that speaks about dying to the ego-self, and being reborn into a new life of awareness, spirituality and illumination. Learn more about symbolic phoenix meanings here.

Of course, the ego isn’t a bad thing, as the peacock clearly indicates. There’s a reason somebody cooked up that phrase, “proud as a peacock”. If you watch a male – they are about as cocky as they come. It’s all about showing off and wooing the ladies. It takes a lot of brass to attract a bevy of beautiful peahens. This is a symbolic nod to us encouraging us to get some hustle in our bustle. Peacock reminds us sometimes it’s totally okay to flaunt our stuff and show off our skills. This is particularly true in situations when we want to gain attention for our betterment. Peacock energy can remind us we are amazing, and we should fan out our assets to land the opportunities we are seeking.

I hope you enjoyed these thoughts on the symbolic meaning of the peacock. If you liked this article, you may also like my page on peacock symbolism for tattoo ideas here. Check out the links on this page for more bird meanings cool symbolic info. Thanks for reading!

May all your peacock experiences reveal bright insights.

What were the peacoc doing? Trying to unsuccessfully fly. This is my dream and I am the creator of the scene. So, my teachers are letting me know that I am also trying to spiritually fly BUT I'm not able to. Most were males but some were hens and chicks. I am looking at symbols of myself and my other lives where all of us are trying to spiritually release ourselves from our restrictive beliefs. Many of my other lives that are doing this are male.

Then I am also seeing yet more totems!!!!!! Pigeons! Here's what Ted has to say about this:
PIGEON

KEYNOTE: Return to the Love and Security of Home

CYCLE OF POWER: Year-round

The pigeon is an unusual bird. Although most people think of it as a pest in the city environment, it has very unique characteristics. It is also tied to very gentle and loving archetypal energies.

Today the word “dove” and “pigeon” are used interchangeably. Although there is a difference, the two species are related. It would be wise for anyone with a pigeon as a totem to study the characteristics of the dove as well.

The pigeon has a long history associated with the home and with fertility. The real name of Christopher Columbus was “Colombo” which is the Italian word for “pigeon.” Columbus helped discover a new home. The pigeon also has an extraordinary homing sense. It knows how to find its way back home, no matter how far it has gone.

It is because of this that they often are symbols for a time or a need to return to the security of home. Pigeons can teach us how to find our way back when we are lost. They help us to remember and find the love of home and homelife that we have either given up or lost. They are the only bird that can drink by sucking up water into their beaks. This reflects that ability to draw on the energies of home, no matter how distant.

They are reminders to us to remember that which has positively affected us from our early home life. Have we forgotten who we are? Are we falling into old patterns we vowed to remember and change? Have we forgotten our basic foundations, the heritage we have had passed on to us through home and family? This includes the morals, the behaviors, the attitudes, etc. Draw upon them and use them.

Because they breed rapidly and publicly, pigeons came to be sacred symbols for fertility gods and goddesses. They reflect the fertility of home and family that can occur when they are around. Pigeons will huddle together during a storm. If there are storms in your life, huddle with your family-biological or otherwise. There will be safety and security in that activity. Remember that pigeons remind us of the possibilities, real and ideal, associated with home and family.

What a wonderful dream!!!! I am giving myself LOTS of encouragement to learn to listen to myself, showing that I am well supported spiritually! Then the scene changes...

Now I am in winter, a symbol of a time when nature is pausing to regrow. I need to address some inner beliefs. And what do I see? Yet more totems - white doves, mallards, and wood ducks (of both sexes) contentedly resting in the snow!!!!!

Before i get to what these totems mean, I want to point out that snow and ice in my dreams are symbols of my frozen feminine. So these totems are sitting there, patiently waiting for me to figure this out on my own and address masculine based beliefs restricting my feminine to flow.

DOVES

KEYNOTE: Feminine Energies of Peace, Maternity, and Prophecy

CYCLE OF POWER: Dawn and Dusk

The dove has a tremendous wealth of lore and legend surrounding it. Most of it centers around all of the traditional feminine and mother symbols. In the Greek tradition, Aphrodite was born from an egg brooded by a dove. The Oracles of Dodona which Alexander sought were founded by a dove. To the Slavs, the soul would become a dove at death. To the alchemist, it was a symbol of sublimation. To the Christians, it is a symbol of peace, while to early pagans it was a symbol for the yoni or female sexual organs. It has been associated with female sexuality through such goddesses as Astarte and Isis. Because of its association with many goddesses, it was considered the embodiment of the maternal instinct. “The name dove has been given to oracles and to prophets . .. The prophet sent to Ninevah as God’s messenger was called Jonah or the Dove ...”

To the Pueblo Indians it was also honored. Its feathers were often worn and used in prayer sticks. The mournful song of the dove was considered an invocation to water and an indication to men where the water could be found. (Again we have the ancient symbol for the maternal in the connection to water.) Its song would signify waterholes or springs to which the dove must return at dusk to drink.

The song of the dove speaks to all who hear it. Its mournful tones stir the emotions, the internal waters. During the summers, as a child, I loved being up before others had arisen. I remember stepping out the front door, the morning sun soft, and from the woods surrounding the house would come the sweet-sad song of the mourning dove. It always seemed to stir a sense of promise.

The dove is actually a smaller copy of the now-extinct passenger pigeon. A study of its qualities will help you in understanding the significance of the dove in your own life.

The dove is also a ground feeder, reflective of keeping contact with Mother Earth and the creative possibilities of the feminine energies on earth. Its diet is mostly seeds, but it will eat stones that accumulate in the gizzard to help with digestion. Those with a dove as a totem will find it beneficial that they eat bulk to aid their own digestive and creative processes.

The brood of the dove consists of two eggs. Two is a traditional number for the feminine and creative energies. A study of numerology, as applied to doves, will add even more insight for you.

The dove’s song is its most distinctive characteristic. The voice of the dove is the rain song. Out of its mourning, it invokes new waters of life. Its song should remind us that no matter
what our life conditions, new waters and new life are still possible. The Earth is a female planet, and this should remind us that creation and new birth is available to all of us upon it. The mourning dove helps us to remember that.

Although its song is heard throughout the day, it seems more distinct at dawn and dusk. These are the “Between Times”-a time in which there is a thinning of the veils between the physical and the spiritual, the past and the future. The dove can help you to use these times to see the creation process active within your own life.

The song of this totem tells you to mourn what has passed, but awaken to the promise of the future. It is a bird of prophecy and can help you to see what you can give birth to in your life.

DUCKS

KEYNOTE: Emotional Comfort and Protection

CYCLE OF POWER: Spring and Summer

The duck is probably the most common waterfowl. Because of its connection to water, it is linked to the feminine energies, the astral plane, and to the emotional state of humans. Water is necessary for all life on earth. Nothing can live without it. Ducks can remind us to drink of the waters of life as well as to nurture our own emotional natures.

All breeds of ducks swim. Some can dive as deep as 100 feet. Others eat by dipping under the water, reminding us we can find sustenance in our emotions. All ducks live near or on the water, except the wood duck. On land they do not move as well. For those with a duck as a totem it may reflect an inability to feel comfortable with most people in your life. It may reflect a need to find comfort in your own element and with those of life mind and spirit. Ducks can remind us that we are going to have such an opportunity.

Ducks have played important roles in other countries and cultures, and this may reflect past- life connections. The Egyptians were the first to domesticate ducks. The Chinese pioneered the art of duck raising. These are but two simple examples that could be explored.

The colors of the duck can help you in determining specifically the role it will play in your life. Most ducks are a variety of colors, ranging from white to the rich blue-green iridescence of mallards and wood ducks.

The Wood Duck

Wood ducks are unique among all ducks in that they can climb trees and actually will live in them. As with all ducks though, they can help us connect with the archetypal energies that can help us develop a greater sense of emotional comfort and protection in our lives.

The mallard is one of the most prolific ducks. It is probably good that it is so because it is also one of the most widely hunted. They can be very amiable and display a wide variety of emotions. They are also easily imprinted. For several years I participated in an adopt-a-duck program run by the Dayton Museum of Natural History every Easter. The mallards would be raised until old enough to be released into the wild to help repopulate certain areas.

They would follow me around the house and yard. I was, to all purposes, their father and
mother. They have a great ability to show affection, and they are very community oriented. They like having others around. They will also return to wherever they feel safe and comfortable. Ducks can sometimes remind us to return to those parts of ourself or those activities that we feel safe and comfortable in as well.

During the summer, most male mallards go through an “eclipse” phase-a period in which they are flightless. During this time, they wear the drab plumage of the female for extra protection in the rearing of the young. Even the young take to the water easily, and it reminds us not to close off our emotional sides. We should be as willing to explore our emotions as every other aspect of our life.

The wood duck is also a colored wild duck. It has an iridescence to its feathers that reflects a kind of spirituality that will open up to you as you begin to come into your own element. Wood
ducks all perch in trees to some extent, and they have toes on their webbed feet to help them in climbing. The wood ducks nest in hollow branches and large woodpecker-type holes above and away from the water.

How the young get out of the nest and into the water is difficult to say, although it is generally accepted that ducklings can and do jump down from the trees alone. Wood ducks, in general, have many intriguing habits-more than can be covered in this work. As you study them, you will find ways of applying their habits to your own life.

All ducks have a grace upon water, and as a totem they can help you to handle your own emotions with greater grace and comfort. They serve to teach you how to maneuver through various waters of life. Many psychologist and therapists could do no better than to have a duck as a totem to assist them in helping others move through their emotional tangles.

So why the albino ones? They are white, showing me that they are the first ones I should attempt to connect with. The only thing holding me back is...myself.

I hope that this has given you something that resonates deep within you. It's none of my business, but I feel that you had an emotional/physical event in your hometown you need to address and heal over.

Hugs,
Guy
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Re: Birds in the park.

Postby aussie_musician » Fri Dec 14, 2018 4:21 pm

well .. you mentioned peafowl and so I googled it ..

they are similar to a peacock .. interesting ..

for me .. the change from summer to winter for you .. refers to the changes of seasons for you .. like that of the weather seasons ..

obviously I don't know what those changes for you are .. but hey .. change is inevitable ..

after summer .. there is always winter .. it has to happen ..
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